Molly McNamee | Sore or Injured?
1826
post-template-default,single,single-post,postid-1826,single-format-standard,ajax_fade,page_not_loaded,,qode_grid_1300,footer_responsive_adv,qode-theme-ver-10.0,wpb-js-composer js-comp-ver-4.12,vc_responsive

Sore or Injured?

Sometimes it can be hard to tell if what you are feeling is pain from being sore or pain from hurting yourself. The two can be mixed up quite often. Today I want to clear a few things up and hopefully help you decide what is going on with your muscles.

If you have muscle soreness you likely feel achy when you walk or perform other basic functions, like picking up a book or using the restroom. Luckily, the more you move while you are sore, the quicker you can get over that period of soreness.

If you have chronic soreness or are sore everyday no matter what, your body is likely being overworked and you should take a rest day. But use that rest day to do some light stretches and foam rolling. Try to release some tension and loosen up those tight muscles so they don’t get worse.

Being hurt differs from soreness because it interferes with life. You will feel a sharp, shooting pain that will get worse the more you move. Injuries are often accompanied by swelling and discoloration.

Injuries can be split into two categories: minor injuries and major injuries. Minor injuries typically last up to a week and heel with the R.I.C.E method (rest, ice, compression, and elevation). If an injury does not improve after that time, it may be more serious and move into the major injury category. If that is the case, see a doctor immediately.

I work with a lot of individuals and some get scared when they feel soreness for the first time. If you aren’t used to it, it can feel like you’ve done something wrong. But it’s important to not mix up the two because the methods of healing each ailment are very different. For an injury, you rest. For soreness, you move. So take note of what you are feeling and if you truly are concerned ask a professional for his or her advice.